Overcoming Obstacles, Step 2

The Match.  The connotation of “match-making” has always been a little bit magical, from back in the day when aunts and friends would thrust a couple into a lifelong marriage, to the tech-happy internet dating sites in today’s world.  We make a different type of match at the Volunteer English Program, not a romantic one, yet also based on compatibility.  Unlike the old-fashioned match-making, our match begins with a one-hour session to get things off on the right foot, followed by monthly updates, all to encourage success.

beaulieu-yuanAfter we train volunteers from the community to be English tutors, and after students undergo the intake process (see Overcoming Obstacles, Step 1), the VEP staff matches each student with a tutor who has the same time of availability and location.  We choose a tutor who might complement the student’s goals, interests, family structure, or ability level.  The “jigsaw puzzle” of matching available tutors to waiting students is part science, part art, as we attempt to align as many factors as possible for the pair, to promote longevity and compatibility.

And then comes the memorable moment when the two meet here in the VEP office.  Irma Pomales-Connors (VEP Program Director) or I sit with the pair for at least an hour, making introductions, planning lessons and reviewing materials, modeling a tutoring session, and practicing techniques that tutors learned in the Tutor Training Workshop.  The tutor and student leave here with goals and a game-plan.

Both student and tutor are a little bit nervous to meet that first time.  We quickly put everyone at ease, asking some questions, modeling the proper speaking speed to accommodate the student’s level.  The tutor leans in, completely engaged as the student tells of his/her challenges, obstacles, goals, and dreams — and I can see the student’s whole demeanor relax and open up.  Sometimes, the student’s relief is palpable with the realization that a volunteer wants to devote time to help them.  Someone who cares!

We provide books for the student and the tutor, walking through techniques for using them to teach reading, comprehension, writing, speaking and listening.  The tutor practices explaining words and concepts, correcting the student, and leading them through materials.  The two ask each other questions, clarify confusing points, and almost invariably, they laugh together at something for the first time.

After we have set goals, outlined lesson-plans, chosen the bi-weekly meeting place and times, and exchanged contact information, the match appointment is over.  The two will meet on their own somewhere in Chester County now, and we might only see the student occasionally.  The tutor will submit a monthly progress report of hours and activities, but the real magic, the countless moments of understanding, instruction, collaboration, all to open opportunities for that student, will happen without us.  All because of a magical match.

If you would like to experience this new kind of relationship in your life, call us.  We have 72 adult immigrants on the student waiting list; one might be the right student for you.

by Patty Rappazzo Morgioni, Program Coordinator

Advertisements

The Person Next to You

Last night I attended a Christmas concert at a local church, and in the handbell choir I saw the bright, shining face of one of our tutors, ringing away.  It struck me that I continually run into VEP tutors and students in various spots around Chester County.Way-Gonzalez

Yet, when I mention the Volunteer English Program, people often ask, “What’s that?” and inquire about our work.  This is seldom a short interchange, as people are quite inspired and intrigued.  As our Executive Director Terri Potrako says, we are “Chester County’s best kept secret.”  (We are working on being better known!)   We do not have an advertising budget; our word is spread by active volunteers and by vital community partners like libraries, churches, community organizations, and the media.

VEP is actually everywhere around us.  I go to the gym, and I am exercising next to several of our tutors.  I think to myself, ‘that tutor is busy like I am, squeezing in a work-out before heading to the office, yet he gives his time to help someone.’  I push my grocery cart down the aisles of Shop Rite and spot tutors shopping for their family meals.  My neighbor’s father was a volunteer with VEP for years.  At the DMV, in the bookstore, at a restaurant… literally each week, I run into members of the VEP family.  

Wouldn’t you like to know who our tutors are?  If you could spot them, like on a page of Where’s Waldo, you might be amazed at the reach and depth of volunteerism represented.  It could be the person in the cubicle next to you at work, or riding the elevator with you, or dropping off her child at the same day care center.  And THAT is often our best advertising:  tutors tell acquaintances, neighbors, co-workers, friends and family about their transforming experience as a VEP volunteer.  

We do have almost 50 students waiting for a tutor, and we have a Tutor Training Workshop coming up in January (click here for details). If our story appeals to you, please consider signing up for training and working with an adult who needs to learn English.  If you are already a tutor, please spread the word with the person next to you, and recruit someone you know.  

Our tutors and students (approximately 170) meet together all over the community in libraries, cafe’s, etc…  They are out there, every day, probably somewhere very close to you, quietly carrying out our mission of teaching English to adult immigrants and refugees.  And it is an inspiring and gratifying prospect to me, to know I live in a community where such an act is taking place, 170 times, twice per week.  Won’t you make it 171?

by Patty Rappazzo Morgioni, VEP Program Coordinator

Reflecting on a Year of Tutoring

New tutors and students often wonder what the one-to-one tutoring model is really like.  I asked Bev Colestock, tutor, and her student Olga Andrade, a few questions about their relationship.  Bev has been tutoring Olga since May, 2012.

1.  Do you remember your first meeting?  What was it like?  How were you feeling?

Bev and Olga enjoying a tutoring session.

Bev and Olga enjoying a tutoring session.

Bev: I first met Olga in May 2012 at the VEP office. I was a new tutor and she was my first student so I was very excited to meet her. I wasn’t sure how much Olga could understand, so we pretty much spoke through Patty, the program coordinator. I remember I was very nervous because I am not a teacher and wondered if I would actually be able to help this girl. Olga was very sweet and Patty helped get us started by sharing ideas and suggestions from VEP resources. By the time I left that evening, I was feeling more confident and couldn’t wait to meet with Olga again and get to know her.

Olga: I was worried too because I was stuck in traffic and I had an appointment to meet. I was excited, but I was nervous too.  Bev seemed too serious and I didn’t know what to say. Fortunately, Patty was there and she conducted the meeting.

 2. How does that first meeting compare to recent meetings?  How have things improved?  How has your relationship grown?

Bev: Olga and I started out meeting at the Chester County Library in Exton twice a week. Olga and I made a connection right away and are very comfortable with each other. Initially we had a more structured format. We chose stories or news articles to read and discuss. We began making a list of words that Olga had trouble pronouncing and added to it. Many times we would end our meeting with Olga repeating these words over and over. As time went on and we got to know each other better our lessons focused on Olga’s goals at the time: which were writing her resume, moving into a new apartment, explaining something to her car mechanic, etc. Now we meet at my home on Monday & Wednesday evenings and I look forward to her coming. Our relationship has grown from Tutor/Student into a very good friendship that I will always treasure. We spend a lot of time just talking about everything – each other’s families, American and Colombian customs and culture, what we did last weekend, our jobs, etc.

Olga:  Of course we received advice and options from VEP but it was a new experience for both of us as we developed the class. At the beginning we followed a book and as time passed, we worked on my resume, a job interview, appointments, health insurance, etc. I can say I have found in Bev not only a great tutor but also a friend who has helped me to improve my English and feel more confident, and who has helped me and my husband to understand more about this culture and its customs.

 3.  Did something funny ever happen during your tutoring sessions?

Olga: I have always had trouble with my pronunciation. So I remember that many funny situations have been related to my pronunciation. I want to say something but my mouth says something different. However I remember a funny situation where Bev couldn’t stop laughing. It happened when my husband and I moved from Devon to West Chester. I wanted to write in the “Inspection List” that the microwave had a dent but I didn’t know how to write that.  So I used the Google translate and the sentence I wrote was “the microwave has a stroke in the right side”.

Bev:  Olga and I do laugh a lot. I explained why I was laughing and we both ended up laughing about it!

 4.  Olga, what has been the most difficult or challenging part of learning English for you?  How has the one-to-one tutoring model addressed this?

Olga: The most difficult part of learning English has been the pronunciation. Sometimes it seems impossible for me to pronounce a word or make a sound. But at the end after I repeat the word hundreds of times I am able to pronounce it correctly. Of course this always happens with Bev’s help. We have a list with the words that I can’t pronounce easily, so every class we study these words and I have to repeat them many times during the class. Also, Bev always corrects my mistakes while I am talking.

 5.  Bev, what has been your biggest challenge as a tutor?  What surprises did you find along the way?

Bev: Olga has made it very easy for me to be a tutor. She is smart, educated and extremely motivated. I work full time so I was a little concerned about having time to prepare lessons. Lucky for me, Olga is always prepared. She keeps a notebook and writes down questions or phrases that she hears or anything that comes to mind so we can discuss it the next time we meet. Olga is an excellent writer and usually writes a journal about what she did over the weekend. I read it or she reads it to me and that leads into a conversation where she practices her pronunciation. I would say the biggest challenge I have faced is trying to explain why we sometimes say something a certain way in English that doesn’t make sense or is an exception to the rule. My son was taking a Spanish class in college and Olga was helping him one night when she was at my house. What surprised me was she was having the same problem trying to explain to him why things are said a certain way in Spanish, but she didn’t know why.

 6.  Olga, can you measure your growth at all?  What are you able to do now that you couldn’t do before you came to VEP?

Olga: I can say that my English has improved over time. Of course I am aware that I have to continue working on it because it takes time. However, when I began to work with Bev I had some knowledge about grammar, but my biggest problem was when I wanted to talk. I was only able to say some sentences but keeping a conversation was almost impossible for me. Building whole sentences in my mind while I was talking was too hard. Now I am able to keep a conversation, I am able to understand many people (not all of course). Also I am able to follow a movie or a TV program using the subtitles, and I am able to understand the lyrics to some songs and it makes me so happy!

Editor’s note:  If you can see yourself as a student or a tutor with the Volunteer English Program, give us a call at 610-918-8222, or visit us at www.volunteerenglish.org.